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Hamman plans to avoid hooplah until after lifts

 

blue01_next.gifBy Glen Miller/The Mustang News

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the fourth installment in a series of stories on Mustang’s Shane Hamman’s preparation for the Athens Olympics.

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the fourth installment in a series of stories on Mustang’s Shane Hamman’s preparation for the Athens Olympics.

When Mustang’s Shane Hamman   walks   into Olympic Stadium with Team USA for the opening ceremonies of the Athens Games, local fans had better be looking fast for a glimpse of the weightlifter.

Because at the end of the ceremonies, Hamman will become a hermit of sorts, locking himself away from the pomp and circumstance of the Olympic experience.

“Before I lift in the Olympics, not too many people are going to see me,” said Hamman.

“I’m going to isolate myself, it’s all business after that. Once I compete, I will be out and around the Olympics.”

The decision to pass over the “Olympic experience” in favor of isolation came after conferences with his coach and learning from his experiences at the 2000 Games in Syndney.

“I saw the last Olympics as an experience. I did as well as I could, but I also tried to experience everything at the Olympics,” said Hamman. ‘But this time I’m going in knowing what I have to do to medal. I’m going there to win, so it’s a different feeling. I’m going to be in my own little world through all the craziness of the Olympics.”

Hamman said many people don’t realize how much stress your body, even those of the athletes, take just walking around the Olympics. The Nikaia Weightlifting Hall itself ins located over 12 kilometers from the Olympic Stadium.

“I need to stay off my feet. When you are doing stuff at the Olympics, you don’t realize how much you are standing on your feet. I need to have enough strength in my legs, so that is why I’ll be in my room,” said Hamman.

Hamman admits staying there will be hard.

“I’m sure it will he hard because I will have invitations to do stuff. I could be busy every day and every night. But I am there for a reason and that will be able to help me say no to everything,” said Hamman.

Having been in Sydney will be another reason to rest.

“I think that helps because I did get to experience the Games. It’s good that this is not my first Olympics, because you do want to do everything and to be involved. I will go to the opening ceremonies, but after that I will get a little quiet,” said Hamman.

Resting also means switching up his planned eight-week training regiment that was to lead him right up to the days before competing. Hamman originally planed to keep adding weight to his daily training sessions, even after arriving in Athens.

But after looking as the results from the 2000 Games, his coach had decided on a change.

“I’m changing every day on what I will be doing and this is so much different. I will be going all my heavy training here and then when I head out I will do my technique work and resting.

“I went to Syndey and trained heavy up until the day I was to lift. This time my last heavy workout will be 17 days out. That is my plan right now,” said Hamman.

Hamman said his recent lifting sessions have left him tired and unable to get a lot of sleep at night – which led to the radical change in training.

“We’re trying this out, but if I can train hard now and the rest the remainder of the time my body should be ready to explode when it comes time to compete,” said Hamman.

But is he worried about straying from a winning formula?

“We are trying something new and we hope that it works. But this is the Olympics and that’s what you have to do. You have to push the envelope and do what ever it takes to get the edge on someone else,” said Hamman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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